First Drive: 2017 Honda Clarity Fuel Cell Electric

First Drive: 2017 Honda Clarity Fuel Cell Electric

Welcome To Space Age Transportation

We have driven the future—and it feels a lot like today. We recently drove the production version of the 2017 Honda Clarity, the third entry in the hydrogen fuel cell field (after the Hyundai Tuscon and the market leader, Toyota Mirai). It’s a real car that should help move fuel cell cars incrementally closer to the automotive mainstream.

2017 Honda Clarity

A normal, functional, high-tech dash

Let’s move past the old narrative that hydrogen fuel cell cars are the transportation of the future—and always will be—and focus on the cars available today. The Honda Clarity demonstrates the exciting aspect of this technology, but also shows the struggle these “future” cars have to fit into the mainstream.

This is the third generation of Honda’s fuel cell cars (the fuel cell “engines” have gone through many more generations during the 20 years of development as all new technologies do). The Gen 1 was the Honda Plus FCEV, which used the company’s electric car platform to get early models out on the road for testing. It was a mundane package, but it drove great.

The second generation, now named Clarity, was a big car, great-looking in the subdued Honda style, but still not ready for prime time. A few were made available for lease to select fuel cell enthusiasts. When we drove it, much like our experience with the first generation, it impressed us with the refinement of it as a functional car. It was fast, smooth and felt ready to hit the showroom.

Now we have Gen 3–also Honda Clarity. It is all new, a more radical design than the previous generation, but still governed by Honda’s conservative approach. It also feels identical to a mainstream Honda in every way except its powertrain. The tip-off that we’re still not in the mainstream comes if you really want to buy one–you still can’t at Honda (the Toyota Mirai can be purchased). For now, the Clarity is a lease-only vehicle, like the Mirai only available in the areas of California that have the initial stations of the still nascent fueling network.

2017 Honda Clarity

It’s got a look of the future

The advances through the years have shrunk the fuel cell stack size, increased its power and durability and reduced its costs. That’s great, but this advancement also has precipitated a dramatic redesign with each generation since optimal packaging is necessary to reduce weight and make sure the performance is at the top of its game. Challenging doesn’t begin to describe it. It’s not a problem for a concept car every couple years, but for volume production, that’s a big hurdle. It’s one that will likely keep all fuel cell cars at small volumes until the engineers feel like they’ve got a package that will attract a larger audience.

2017 Honda Clarity

Smaller, but more powerful

So what’s an automaker to do. Put a stake in the ground and launch. Hyundai took a short cut, dropping a fuel cell powertrain in its Tucson SUV and hitting the market first. It also was only available for lease. Toyota followed with a bigger splash—the purpose-designed Mirai, which incorporated some Prius styling hints/synergy, but it is clearly its own vehicle. And you can purchase as well as lease it.

Now comes Honda. Rather than carry forward with the slick, if not instantly recognizable design of the Clarity, Honda laid out a course like its rival Toyota with a unique, edgy design. It works. Of course, the company has announced it’s sharing that design with new battery electric and plug-in hybrid models, but it should help make a mark.

For all its future technology under the hood, the 2017 Honda Clarity drives like most contemporary electric cars. It’s responsive with great low-end torque. The true five-passenger, four-door sedan comes well-equipped with all of the modern technology expected in a car, such as a dual-zone climate control, an infotainment system that includes a 540-watt/12-speaker audio system and an eight-inch high-res touch screen with navigation that includes hydrogen refueling stations. Additionally, the system is Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatible. The fuel-cell vehicle also features the Honda Sensing package of safety equipment and the LaneWatch blind-spot monitoring system. You do lose some trunk space because of the hydrogen storage tank placed behind the back seat; the 11.8 cubic feet of trunk space in the Clarity is almost five cubic feet less than the subcompact Fit.

2017 Honda Clarity

The trunk is sacrificed to the fuel tank

While it is an electric drive car, the Clarity has a 350+ mile range between fill-ups (one of the big advantages of a hydrogen-fueled electric car compared to a battery-powered one). The limitation, of course, is there are not that many fueling stations (28 are open in California as of this writing and that number is expected to double within a year or two). Less this cramp your style, Honda and its competitors include free fuel in the price of their fuel cell cars.

The lease price of the Clarity is only a few dollars different than the Mirai, which is to be expected at this stage of the game. For those who qualify and live near the 12 California dealers that will be the initial market, the 2017 Honda Clarity can be leased for $369/month with $2,868 down. Not a bad deal to drive the future.

Related Stories You Might Enjoy:

First Drive: 2016 Toyota Mirai

News: Toyota Mirai Fuel Cell Car Hits the Market

News: Honda Introduces Clarity Fuel Cell

2014 LA Auto Show: A Hydrogen Milestone

Disclosure:

Clean Fleet Report is loaned free test vehicles from automakers to evaluate, typically for a week at a time. Our road tests are based on this one-week drive of a new vehicle. Because of this we don’t address issues such as long-term reliability or total cost of ownership. In addition we are often invited to manufacturer events highlighting new vehicles or technology. As part of these events we may be offered free transportation, lodging or meals. We do our best to present our unvarnished evaluations of vehicles and news irrespective of these inducements.

Our focus is on vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in their class, which leads us to emphasize electric cars, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and diesels. We also feature those efficient gas-powered vehicles that are among the top mpg vehicles in their class. In addition, we aim to offer reviews and news on advanced technology and the alternative fuel vehicle market. We welcome any feedback from vehicle owners and are dedicated to providing a forum for alternative viewpoints. Please let us know your views at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.

 

 

 

Road Test: 2017 Chrysler 300 S Hemi V-8

Road Test: 2017 Chrysler 300 S Hemi V-8

The Past Meets Present Fuel Efficiency

Chrysler’s 2017 300 Series sedans are certainly too new to be called classics, but they bristle with touches from the past: classic proportions—long hood, short rear deck and a dramatic profile; a grille reminiscent of the mid-1950s; spacious, luxurious appointed cabin; rear wheel drive; and, of course, the legendary Chrysler Hemi V-8 engine.

When the 300 Series was first introduced in the ’50s, Chrysler’s “Letter Series” cars were large, premium automobiles. The Chrysler name was associated with luxury and their offerings played in the same league as Cadillac and Lincoln. But unlike the originals, today’s 300 four-door sedans compete for business by clashing with rivals that are in a different league than the past—the Chevrolet Impala, Ford Taurus, Toyota Avalon and Nissan’s Maxima. One of Chrysler’s distinctions is that it’s the only one in this group offering two things prized in old and new big cars–a V-8 engine and all-wheel drive, though you can’t get the two together.

The tradition of offering 300 Series cars with different levels of luxury and powerplants continues today. Four core models make up the 2017 Chrysler 300 line, ranging from a well-equipped mainstream full-size sedan in the 300 Limited to the luxurious 300C Platinum. The 300S offers a sportier alternative for the younger crowd, while the 300C balances on a near-luxury beam.

A Higher MPG Option

Just two engines are offered in the 2017 Chrysler 300. The base engine is a 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 that earns 19/30/23 mpg city/highway/combined on the EPA cycle, or 18/27/21 mpg with all-wheel drive. Other than the Avalon Hybrid, this is the top fuel economy for a full-size car.

A step up to a 5.7-liter Hemi V-8, available on 300S, 300C, and 300C Platinum gets an EPA-estimated mileage quote of 16/25/19 mpg. As noted–a one of a kind, so best-of-breed by default.

Since neither of the two engines comes close to the fuel economy numbers of the cars that we normally review, readers might question why we would write about a V-8 powered car with middling mpg numbers.  The simple answer is, we cover green technologies, improvements to fuel efficiency and alternative powertrains for all classes of vehicles–not just those with the very highest fuel efficiency.

According to Experian Automotive, which specializes in collecting and analyzing automotive data, Americans own an average of 2.28 vehicles per household, and more than 35 percent of households own three or more cars. And it is likely that one of those three cars doesn’t have stellar fuel economy.

What The Heck Is A Hemi Engine?

Hemi is a trademark name by Chrysler (now FiatChrysler Automobiles) that refers to the engine’s hemispherical combustion chamber’s design. The name reflects the concept of a domed cylinder head and the top of the piston enclosing a space that approximates a half of a sphere (hemi+sphere+ical), although in practice it is generally less than half.

2017 Chrysler 300S

2017 Chrysler 300S–the engine

Chrysler developed their first experimental hemi engine for the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighter aircraft in 1945. The automaker applied their military experience with the hemispherical combustion chamber to their first overhead-valve V-8 engine, released under the name FirePower, not “Hemi,” and produced a second-generation version before ending production in the early ’70s.

The 2005 Chrysler 300C model marked the return of the legendary Hemi engine to the company’s lineup. Compared to the original, the new Hemi doesn’t have a pure hemispherical combustion chamber. Much of the bowl area of the combustion chamber was filled in to encourage the fuel-air mixture to stir itself prior to ignition. The chamber is shallower than past Hemis so the top of the piston is nearly flat.

Even though it isn’t a genuine Hemi, this current 5.7-liter V-8 engine packs the powerful punch of 363 horsepower and 396 pounds-feet of torque. So how can this high-performance V-8 in a car that weighs more than 4,000 pounds deliver 16 mpg in the city and 25 mpg on the highway? Engine technology called cylinder deactivation seamlessly turns off fuel consumption in four cylinders when V-8 power is not needed, such as highway cruising. Add in an eight-speed automatic transmission, and you have a recipe for big engine fuel efficiency.

The transimission is operated via a rotary knob. Select S, and the throttle tightens up, the downshifts get more aggressive, gears are held longer, and the transmission will hang out in lower gears than normal. Choose the paddle shifters while in S, the transmission will go full manual and won’t revert back to auto.

Designed In Detroit

Swagger, presence, boldness—whatever you want to call it, the 2017 Chrysler 300 has it. It’s a look that stands out from its peers, even though its basic shape launched more than a decade ago. It remains a handsome car in the more traditional Detroit mold with plenty of chrome trim.

This second generation Chrysler 300 received a front and rear refresh in 2015. The grille was enlarged with a different mesh-type pattern, and headlights were redesigned, with C-shaped LED daytime running lights for instant notoriety. To complement the new grille, the lower air dam was redesigned with chrome accents and fresh LED fog lamps. On the backside, the rear fascia was visually widened with polished exhaust tips enlarged and pushed to the corners; while new LED tail lamps with an illuminated halo added a flash of elegance.

The profile remains the square-shouldered, brawny, yet sleek look it has been since 2012’s redesign, but now has a slightly less-flashy, more buttoned-down look.

2017 Chrysler 300S

2017 Chrysler 300S

In the 1950s the Letter Series always signified Chrysler’s premium automobile and does so today. The 2017 300 is sure to impress with its interior design and furnishings. Trim and accent pieces are high quality, and the car is put together solidly. One attractive feature is the inclusion of standard Nappa leather seats, which is an especially premium material that’s usually an upgrade even in luxury models.

Faithful to its raison d’etre, few competitors can match the Chrysler 300 when it comes to passenger accommodations. The 300 can comfortably seat five people. The back seat offers more than 40 inches of leg space, so even taller passengers can stretch out. Full-size adults can fit in the rear comfortably, which you can’t do in most modern five-passenger cars. Front seats are equally roomy, and the driver’s seat is a great place to work with features like a power-adjustable steering wheel and heated/ventilated seats. The 300’s trunk gives you 16.3 cubic feet of space, enough for a whole family’s luggage or a foursome’s golf bags.

For 2017 the Chrysler 300 received a thorough round of upgrades, focusing on the electronics suite. Among the updates are a new fourth-generation Uconnect infotainment system with smartphone integration, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity, an upgraded 8.4-inch touchscreen that now recognizes multi-touch and swipe gestures. The Uconnect touchscreen interface is one of my favorites, pairing large buttons and crisp graphics with a logical menu structure.

Standard features include dual-zone automatic climate control, a six-speaker audio system, satellite radio, Bluetooth phone connectivity and audio streaming, two USB ports, the Uconnect infotainment system and a rearview camera. Optional features include a sunroof, a choice of premium audio systems, navigation and adaptive headlights.

On the safety side, available are forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking, lane departure warning, lane keep assist, automatic high beams and adaptive cruise control.

When The Hemi Meets The Road

Looking back to 2005 when the Chrysler 300 was revived, there’s one thing that hasn’t changed about the car—how it drives. It still feels like a big imposing car. The big, long dashboard rolled out ahead into the long, wide hood giving a sense of length to the car, and the wide, short windshield seemed to stretch the car from one side of the lane to the other. From behind the steering wheel, it imparts a feeling of privilege generally reserved for much more expensive cars.

2017 Chrysler 300S

An expensive area of privilege

The 300S was a soothing respite to the bustle of noisy city traffic—nicely soundproofed, luxuriously appointed and a pleasure to drive. This isn’t a cut and dart kind of car to gain a couple spots in traffic, and you sure as heck can’t pull a U-turn on narrow city streets. Parallel parking? Only if you are proficient.

The big Chrysler moved fast off the line, and since it’s rear drive, there’s no torque steer to contend with. The Hemi has a lot of good torque and lots of power right off idle. You can waste a set of tires without even trying.

On the highway, the 300 drove like a big American car should; stable and confident. There was just enough engine, road, and wind noise to keep me connected with the road. Comfortable ride quality is one of the 300’s strong selling points. Regardless of the road surface—raised slabs, tilted slabs, pot holes, dips, exaggerated expansion joints—the 300 was always calm and collected. I particularly like the suspension tuning, which is a nice balance between the taught European offerings and the somewhat softer Japanese setups.

Handling in the 300S was more about comfort and ride quality than performance—this is, after all, a large sedan. When the road turned twisty, I could feel the 300’s size, although the standard electric power steering made light work of taking the turns. The 300 was not a ballerina, but it wasn’t a lumbering bear.

After a week in the 2107 Chrysler 300S, the 294 miles comprised considerably more highway miles than city miles. That could explain the 23.8 combined mpg—not exactly a gas guzzler after all.

In The Marketplace

The base 2017 Chrysler 300 Limited trim with the V-6 engine starts at $33,435 including destination charges, the priciest 300 trim, the 300C Platinum with the Hemi V-8, clocks in at $46,865. Our Bright White 300S with optional sunroof, cooled performance front seats, appearance package and bigger brakes stickered at $42,995.

2017 Chrysler 300S

The fit is right and snake can result

With a starting price nearly $5,000 lower than the cheapest Chrysler 300, the Chevrolet Impala is worth a look. While it earns better fuel economy, it eschews many of the 300’s luxury features and no V-8 engine is offered.

Toyota’s Avalon comes the closest to the 300’s luxury appointments, but it’s front-wheel drive only and offers only four- and six-cylinder engines. Over at Nissan, the Maximum is more fun to drive with slightly better fuel mileage than the 300, however, the interior lacks the premium look and feel of the Chrysler and there is no V-8 engine available.

That big car feel can be charming, especially with the Hemi V-8 under the hood. In this era of crossovers and hybrids, the 2017 Chrysler 300S redefines old school cool. The 300 is best for those who crave V-8 muscle and need plenty of room and comfort to haul a family. If that description fits you, you need to test drive the 2017 Chrysler 300 with Hemi power.

Related Stories You Might Enjoy:

Road Test: 2016 Chevrolet Impala

Road Test: 2016 Nissan Maxima

Road Test: 2016 Toyota Avalon

Disclosure:

Clean Fleet Report is loaned free test vehicles from automakers to evaluate, typically for a week at a time. Our road tests are based on this one-week drive of a new vehicle. Because of this we don’t address issues such as long-term reliability or total cost of ownership. In addition we are often invited to manufacturer events highlighting new vehicles or technology. As part of these events we may be offered free transportation, lodging or meals. We do our best to present our unvarnished evaluations of vehicles and news irrespective of these inducements.

Our focus is on vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in their class, which leads us to emphasize electric cars, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and diesels. We also feature those efficient gas-powered vehicles that are among the top mpg vehicles in their class. In addition, we aim to offer reviews and news on advanced technology and the alternative fuel vehicle market. We welcome any feedback from vehicle owners and are dedicated to providing a forum for alternative viewpoints. Please let us know your views at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.

 

News: Will Hyundai Bring its New EV To the US?

News: Will Hyundai Bring its New EV To the US?

New Kona Subcompact EV Announced

Following the success of its new Kia Niro crossover, Korean auto group Hyundai announced recently that it will bring its new Hyundai Kona crossover to North America in 2018. Also in the works, according to the Korean Herald, is an all-electric version of the Kona for the Korean market.

The big question is: will the Kona EV come to North America?

2018 Hyundai Kona

Hyundai’s new Kona will come to the US with a gas engine in 2018, but will we get the EV?

The new small SUV is not be based on the current Kia Niro or Hyundai Ioniq platform (Kia is a subsidiary of Hyundai), but will feature an all new platform; one that Hyundai-Kia will likely use as a base for most of their future electric vehicles. Most important, however, is Kona’s promised all-electric range of about 240 miles (390 km).

Whether or not Kona comes to the U.S. market will likely depend on how well the new Ioniq EV and upcoming Niro plug-in hybrid sell here in North America. With a range of 125 miles, the Ioniq out performs most standard EVs in its category, but still half the level of upcoming Tesla Model 3 and Chevrolet’s Bolt EV.

While Kona would likely not compete directly with the new Tesla, it would be a direct competitor for the Chevrolet Bolt EV. A report from Autobild estimates a €35,000 price tag on the Kona electric car, which is roughly $45,000 USD, putting Kona significantly above Bolt’s starting price of about $36,000.

Despite the price difference, Kona’s larger size and SUV profile might help it top the smaller Bolt EV if it comes to the U.S. market. If Hyundai brings the Kona to North America, look for Kia to do the same with its upcoming Stonic EV (which will be based on the same platform).

Related Stories You Might Enjoy:

Comparison Test: Hyundai Ioniq EV & Hybrid

Road Test: 2017 Kia Niro (Steve’s view)

Road Test: 2017 Kia Niro (John’s view)

First Drive: 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

Comparison Test: 2017 Ford Fusion Hybrid and Energi

Comparison Test: 2017 Ford Fusion Hybrid and Energi

Green and Greener

Ford’s Fusion has taken over a traditional role at Ford—that of the best-selling car. For those who don’t savor driving a crossover or SUV, the midsize sedan segment remains popular and includes such perennial bestsellers as the Toyota Camry, Honda Accord and Nissan Altima.

2017 Ford Fusion

For 2017, your shifter’s round

The Fusion remains attractive, so I assume that Ford realized that when they doled out only modest midcycle updates. Outside, the front end gets sharpened while the taillamps become connected by a chrome bar, but otherwise things remain about the same. Inside, the transmission control is transformed into a finely rendered disc, like a small, thick hockey puck, much like the one in Jaguars and Land Rovers, but without the clever rising effect found in those luxury makes.

This American-brand car, built in Mexico, comes in a variety of flavors, but let’s look at the two greenest ones—the Hybrid and the Energi.

The Ford Fusion Hybrid

Ford Fusion

Not a Leaf, but leaves to help you drive more economically

The 2017 Fusion Hybrid combines a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine with an electric motor for a total of 188 horsepower and 129 pounds-feet of torque. Like a good hybrid, the Fusion moves between these two energy sources automatically, depending on driving conditions and driver input. Take it easy on the accelerator and you’ll find the Hybrid remains more in electric mode. Climb a hill and you’ll hear the engine kick in. On downhill descents, the battery charges silently.

This behavior nets you EPA numbers of 43 city/41 highway/42 combined. Compare these with the Toyota Camry Hybrid’s 38 mpg and Honda Accord Hybrid’s 48 combined scores. My Blue Lightning test car averaged 41.0 mpg during its test week.

The Ford Fusion Energi

Choosing the 2017 Ford Energi model adds a major new element into the picture. With its 7.6 kWh battery, this Fusion can run as a pure electric vehicle for an EPA rated 22 miles. That meant that when I took my 18-mile-each-way commute in the Energy, I made it just about door-to-door without using a drop of gas.

2017 Ford Fusion Energi

The plug is the main difference between the Hybrid and the Energi

With the variety in traffic conditions, on a few days I pulled up to the charger at work with a little juice left. The Energi’s EPA ratings, for MPGe this time, are 97 MPGe, or 35 kWh per 100 miles (compare this with other plugin hybrids). The gauge in my Magnetic Metallic (gray) test car read 101.4 MPGe at the end of my test week, and the gas gauge had hardly budged from full.

What’s the Same; What’s Different

Driving the cars feels about the same, except that the Energi is smoother and quieter longer, since an entire trip may not use the gasoline engine at all. The Energi weighs 298 pounds more than the Hybrid (3,913 vs. 3,615 pounds), and its trunk is shortened to accommodate its larger battery (the Hybrid’s smaller battery, without charging ability, has only a 1.4 kWh capacity).

2017 Ford Fusion Energi

An all-electric trip

EPA Green ratings are a very good 8 for Smog and 9 for Greenhouse gas for the Hybrid and 8 and 10 respectively for the Energi. More numbers: the CO2 grams-per-mile output of the Energi runs about half the Hybrid—110 vs. 210.

When you drive the Hybrid, you can set the center screen to show you one of the car’s three driving modes. Under the right conditions, you’re in Electric Drive mode, using no gasoline. When the engine engages, you’re in Hybrid Drive mode, where the engine and motor work together. If you’re generating electricity, you’re in “Recharging High Voltage Battery” mode. These switched back and forth as I drove.

Both cars’ instrument panels provide a bar chart of driving behavior, including acceleration, braking and cruising. Depending on road and traffic conditions, sometimes one or the other metrics dipped into the negative “yellow” condition, but normally they showed the desired blue.

The Levels and Their Costs

Fusions come in different equipment levels, ranging from S to SE to Titanium to Platinum. You can get a regular non-hybrid version, too. My Hybrid wore the Titanium nameplate while the Energi flaunted the top-level Platinum badge on its tail. The Platinum level borders on the luxurious, featuring soft, quilted leather on the seats and doors, among other upgrades.

Ford Fusion

All the tech is here

With $3,760 worth of style and safety options, the Hybrid came to $35,155, including destination and delivery. The Energi, with no extras and with the “Fusion Energi Discount,” rolled in at $39,995.

Interestingly, the annual fuel cost on the window stickers was $900 for the Hybrid and $800 for the Energi. So, your benefits here become less financial and more about environmental impact. There is no pure electric Fusion for sale now, but if industry trends pan out, there could be in the future. For now, if you’re a commuter, you may find the extra cost of the Energi really pays off.

If you want an attractive, comfortable sedan with a little greener perspective, try one of Ford’s two greener Fusions.

Related Stories You Might Enjoy:

Road Test: 2017 Ford Fusion Energi

Road Test: 2017 Toyota Camry Hybrid

Road Test: 2017 Honda Accord Hybrid

First Drive: 2016 Nissan Altima

Disclosure:

Clean Fleet Report is loaned free test vehicles from automakers to evaluate, typically for a week at a time. Our road tests are based on this one-week drive of a new vehicle. Because of this we don’t address issues such as long-term reliability or total cost of ownership. In addition we are often invited to manufacturer events highlighting new vehicles or technology. As part of these events we may be offered free transportation, lodging or meals. We do our best to present our unvarnished evaluations of vehicles and news irrespective of these inducements.

Our focus is on vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in their class, which leads us to emphasize electric cars, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and diesels. We also feature those efficient gas-powered vehicles that are among the top mpg vehicles in their class. In addition, we aim to offer reviews and news on advanced technology and the alternative fuel vehicle market. We welcome any feedback from vehicle owners and are dedicated to providing a forum for alternative viewpoints. Please let us know your views at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.

News: WattTime App Points You To Clean Energy When Charging EVs

News: WattTime App Points You To Clean Energy When Charging EVs

Use Your Phone To Figure Out the Green Time To Charge

WattTime, a Berkeley, Calif., nonprofit, has developed a smartphone app that will help you charge your battery electric vehicle with the cleanest electricity, thus reducing CO2 emissions.

WattTime’s cofounder, Gavin McCormick, said using the app can curb CO2 emissions by at least five percent, with some regions where nuclear or solar power are more prevalent even benefitting from a 100 percent reduction, Spectrum IEEE reports.

green charging

Green charging–it’s about knowing your network

The power grid shifts minute-to-minute between a coal plant and, say, a solar or wind farm, depending on energy demand.

WattTime mines two datasets that enable the app to predict what power plant will be used to meet increased electricity demand at any moment in 106 markets across the U.S.

If a carbon-spewing coal plant is coming on line to meet additional demand, the app can help you delay charging until a clean source of energy is being used, delivering the greenest electricity possible.

A WattTime analysis of New England’s power grid suggested that chargers designed to optimize for price, rather than emissions, can actually increase carbon emissions.

The company believes that its empowering technology gives consumers the ability to shape energy demand and direct it toward cleaner sources.

WattTime is partnering with electric vehicle charging companies, plus it has partnerships with smart thermostat providers that use the app’s intelligence to time electric heating and cooling for minimum carbon emissions. One charging partner that has incorporated WattTime software into its charging system is eMotorWerks.