• Chevrolet Bolt Autocross

Event: Chevrolet Bolt EV Autocross Experience

A Quiet Day Experiencing an Electric Car at the Limit

Consumers are slowly but surely recognizing the benefits of owning an all-electric vehicle. Auto manufacturers have a primary message of driving miles and miles without ever having to buy gasoline. This is exactly what the public needs to hear and fully comprehend for EV sales to increase. While never having to stop at a gasoline station again is a very strong, appealing and sexy selling point, a car has to have more going for it than the ability to get from Point A to B cheaply. It also has to be a pleasant place to hang-out and it must perform.

Chevrolet thought it would be fun (and they were right!) to invite automotive journalists to an autocross course in Southern California, to demonstrate that the 2018 Bolt is more than just a commuter and around-town compact. After a couple hours tearing around tight corners, we were convinced it was.

Power, Traction and Performance

Powered by a 150-kW electric motor driving the front wheels, the 200 horsepower and 266 pound-feet (lb.-ft.) of torque were instant and available at all times. Zipping around in the Bolt was great fun. Chevrolet claims a 6.8-second 0-60 time and 91 mph top speed. But, when on an autocross course, these figures are moot as the top speed might be 35 mph—for a brief few seconds. What we cared about was how to get the 3,560-lb. Bolt around the tight course and not smash too many cones in the process.

Chevrolet Bolt Autocross

The Chevrolet Bolt Autocross showed the EV was way more than just a commuter

The key to the Bolt handling so well starts with the batteries being located under the seats. With the weight placed only a few inches off the ground, the low center of gravity is the envy of race car engineers everywhere. The next factor affecting handling were the tires.

Three of our autocross Bolts had the standard-equipment Michelin Energy Saver 17-inch all-season tires that are designed for low rolling-resistance. To make it more interesting, two of the autocross Bolts were shod with summer tires. According to Mike Burns, Bolt vehicle performance engineer/vehicle dynamics and chassis control, there should be a minuscule difference in grip between the two tires. Maybe in the lab, but not on the track—and certainly not on this day. Depending on the driver, there was a one-to-two second difference in lap times, with the  summer tire easily giving a better road feel, with less tire spin and more grip when braking and diving hard into corners.

A third factor for good handling was the electric power steering not being too light. Many of the cars reviewed by Clean Fleet Report have dumbed-down steering, to the point of a loss of road feel. This is never good, but ever more so when driving fast on tight corners.

Lastly was braking, which was very good and didn’t fade even with repeated hard stomping on the pedal. As with all electric vehicles, the Bolt has a regenerative braking system that, when braking or coasting, converts friction into electricity, which is then returned to the batteries. The Bolt comes standard with an anti-lock braking system, power-assisted front vented and rear solid discs. Handling and driving confidence was aided by dynamic rear brake proportioning and electronic stability control.

Chevrolet Bolt Autocross

The course drew out the Bolt EV’s great handling and agility

Just to spice it up a bit, Chevrolet brought-in a 2018 Volkswagen Golf GTI, a hot hatch known for its great handling. While it certainly did handle well, it traversed the autocross course slower than the Bolt wearing the summer tires. The most likely reason for the Bolt having faster times goes back to the electric motor providing instant torque and horsepower at any speed. The GTI has a 2.0-liter turbocharged engine, which is a blast to drive, but on the autocross course where you are on-and-off the accelerator pedal constantly and quickly, waiting even a split second for the turbo to spin-up was enough for the Bolt to out perform the VW. A small thing, but Chevrolet proved its point vividly how much fun the Bolt EV can be to drive.

Design Assumption vs. Reality

The Bolt has a tall stance, placing it between a hatchback and a crossover. So, the initial impression is that handling will be affected by a higher center of gravity. But with the under-seat battery placement, weight being almost at ground level and the wide-set wheel placement, the minimal body roll was predictable and not an issue, even on the hardest and fastest corners.

Observations: 2018 Chevrolet Bolt EV Autocross – Handling and Performance

Chevrolet Bolt Autocross

The Bolts were faster and had more grip than you’d expect

The 2018 Chevrolet Bolt is not a race car, nor can it be considered sporty. However, a day at the autocross course on timed laps proved it should be seriously considered more than a way to drive around without having to stop at a gasoline station. The quiet performance of the motor might lull people into thinking that the “corners ahead” sign means to lift off the accelerator pedal. The opposite is more like it.

Request from the Chevrolet sales associate a test drive that lets you try out the handling. Don’t scare them, but don’t hold back seeing how much fun you can have in a Bolt.

Whatever you end up buying, Happy Driving!

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Personal One Year with my Chevrolet bolt EV

Personal: My Chevrolet Bolt EV—a Six-Month Update

News: Chevrolet Bolt Available Nationwide in August

First Drive: 2017 Chevrolet Bolt

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About Author: John Faulkner

John Faulkner is an automotive marketing professional with more than 30 years experience branding, launching and marketing automobiles. He has worked with General Motors (all Divisions), Chrysler (Dodge, Jeep, Eagle), Ford and Lincoln-Mercury, Honda, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan and Toyota on consumer events and sales training programs. His interest in automobiles is broad and deep, beginning as a child riding in the back seat of his parent's 1950 Studebaker. He has a keen appreciation of Art Deco design, no bias for domestic versus foreign makes and loves competition - whether that be F1, IndyCar, Sports Cars, NASCAR or participating in Track Days at places such as Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, Thunderhill or Willow Springs. John lives in Dana Point, CA, and enjoys a top-down drive on PCH on an early Sunday morning.

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